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Justin Verlander wins the 2011 MVP


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#1 Hail Cesar

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 02:59 PM

Justin Verlander won the 2011 MVP award today edging out Jacoby Ellsbury.

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Let the Pedro's 1999 was better than Verlander's 2011 debate begin. Actually, there isn't a huge debate. Pedro was better in 1999 than Verlander in 2011. Done. Period. Over.

Maybe Pudge Rodriguez can have his 1999 MVP taken away from him for steroids or something and Pedro will get it by default.

#2 ghostoffoxx

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:50 PM

Verlander wins AL MVP. Good choice in my opinion. When the MVP race is tight, the guy from a playoff team will usually win it (as opposed to Ellsbury and Bautista). Although, by that logic you could make a case for Granderson or Cabrera. I think the right choice was made. Apparently somebody gave Michael Young a first place vote. Those new ballots must be hard for Woody Paige to understand.


I think it was the right choice too. However, I am really bitter about Pedro in 1999. He had an ERA+ of 243 (and and ERA+ 291 in 2000, which is the second best single season of all-time) Verlander, while having the best ERA+ of his career, only had an ERA+ of 170. I figured that after the idiot writers didn't give it to Pedro in '99 or '00 (he only came in 5th in MVP voting that year) that no pitcher would ever win the MVP.

I thought Peter Abraham did a nice job of breaking down his ballot. Verlander was also his first choice...

#3 MrNewEngland

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:02 PM

I think it was the right choice too. However, I am really bitter about Pedro in 1999. He had an ERA+ of 243 (and and ERA+ 291 in 2000, which is the second best single season of all-time) Verlander, while having the best ERA+ of his career, only had an ERA+ of 170. I figured that after the idiot writers didn't give it to Pedro in '99 or '00 (he only came in 5th in MVP voting that year) that no pitcher would ever win the MVP.

I thought Peter Abraham did a nice job of breaking down his ballot. Verlander was also his first choice...


Wasn't it the one writer that completely kept Pedro off the ballot saying he didn't think pitchers could be MVPs... only to vote for someone else a few years later.

Pedro got completely screwed. Also the year he lost the Cy to Zito.

#4 Hail Cesar

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:17 PM

I figured that after the idiot writers didn't give it to Pedro in '99 or '00 (he only came in 5th in MVP voting that year) that no pitcher would ever win the MVP.


Clemens was the last starting pitcher to win the MVP in 1986 prior to Verlander this year. When you compare Clemens and Verlander's MVP seasons, they're strikingly similar. Either way, Pedro's 1999 beats them both. Pedro faced less batters that year, pitched fewer innings, and still had similar numbers and better numbers than both Clemens' 1986 and Verlander's 2011.

Guess the writers just have no love for a guy that kept a midget around for good luck.

#5 Kid T

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 12:57 AM

Wasn't it the one writer that completely kept Pedro off the ballot saying he didn't think pitchers could be MVPs... only to vote for someone else a few years later.

Pedro got completely screwed. Also the year he lost the Cy to Zito.


actually, it was the year before

The MVP result was controversial, as Martínez received the most first-place votes of any player (8 of 28), but was totally omitted from the ballot of two sportswriters, New York's George King and Minneapolis' LaVelle Neal. The two writers argued that pitchers were not sufficiently all-around players to be considered. (However, George King had given MVP votes to two pitchers just the season before: Rick Helling and David Wells; King was the only writer to cast a vote for Helling, who had gone 20–7 with a 4.41 ERA and 164 strikeouts.) MVP ballots have ten ranked slots, and sportswriters are traditionally asked to recuse themselves if they feel they cannot vote for a pitcher.






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